the more bizarre a thing is the less mysterious it proves to be

This rain better be encouraging all my new herbs to grow.

Otherwise, I don’t really have much use for it.

From my current vantage point, things look windy, cold, and well, wet.

Not the kind of weather I’m looking forward to running 3.5 miles in.

If I could eliminate one of those elements, I’d accept my fate. After finishing my last race, complete with driving rain and 45 degree temperatures, I was looking forward to something a little more…comfortable.

As I typed that, the wind picked up.

Wish me luck tonight, chickadees. Hopefully I don’t get blown into Lake Michigan.

In other news, I’ve been tearing through library books, as I’ve gotten overzealous again with the CPL’s hold policy, and my books have been renewed within an inch of their lives.

Most recently finished up?

The Sherlockian, by Graham Moore.


This was a book club that I was actually supposed to read two months ago, but alas, the library did not see fit to get it in my hands until a couple of weeks ago. The book is split between the turn of the 20th century and present times, with the latter story rooted in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (author of the Holmes’ stories, in case you didn’t know) and his involvement in a strange murder case involving suffragettes and tattoos.

The former story is centered around a missing diary from Doyle’s collection. Famed Sherlockian Alex Cale finds the diary, and right before he is to unveil his findings from 20 years of detective work, he is murdered in his hotel room. Harold, the youngest of the Irregulars (an exclusive society of Sherlockians) takes chase, searching for the diary, the murderer, and answers in general.

I’m usually not one for a mystery–aside from the Dragon Tattoo series, I don’t usually pick up something specific touted as “mystery,” but that doesn’t mean I don’t like the genre when I find it in front of me.

I’ll admit that even though we own collections of the Sherlock Holmes’ stories, I’ve never actually picked one up, which I’m now reconsidering.

This book was quick to read, interesting from a historical perspective (which I believe we all know I’m drawn toward), and had likable characters and a good, if not always 100% solid, plot line. If you’re looking for something fast but still of substance, I’d suggest grabbing this one (although I do not suggest going through the CPL, unless you’re not planning on reading it until August).

However, if you are a lover of Holmes and Doyle, be warned. This is historical fiction, so you just have go with it, which I admit is fairly easy when you’re not familiar with his work and life. If you were though, I can see that the book might be slightly more difficult to roll with. But pick it up anyway.

Next up, I have some Richard Russo to take me through Memorial Day weekend, and I just couldn’t be happier about that.

Stay dry, chicks, and I’ll catch up a little closer to the weekend!

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2 Comments

Filed under Chicago, Good Reads, Reflections, Running, Weather

2 responses to “the more bizarre a thing is the less mysterious it proves to be

  1. I also got kind of crazy with the hold policy at the library. There’s really no reason for me to pick up 5 at a time. They won’t get done. And then I’ll not be allowed back into the library after I have racked up a ridiculous amount of dues.

    Yeah… not going back to the AH library… good thing I’m moving!

    • When I was younger and I moved a couple of times, I always left HUGE fines in the libraries I left behind. Since I moved to Chicago I’ve had to wise up though, since I don’t have plans to move anytime soon. When’s the big move??

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